SUE ZOLA

Artist Profile
Director Quentin Tarantino, three-time Academy Award Nominee director David Lynch and Billy Gibbons, original founder of the legendary Texas rock band ZZ Top, are just some of the boldfaced celebrities who have been seduced by the work of Austin glitter artist Sue Zola. But, Zola who uses glitter to evoke emotion and recreate cultural icons and symbols of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s is not fazed at all. Her work has been featured in high-profile TV shows such as VH-1’s reality show, The Pick-Up Artist, The Food Network’s Diners, Drive In’s & Dives and the Hit Show Will and Grace; its attention-getting, bright, shiny, funky pieces a metaphor for our current and past times. Zola’s glitter art has been exhibited in many cities all over the country including Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles and has appeared in Las Vegas art shows with legendary punk rock icons Iggy Pop, Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordan to benefit the Burlesque Hall of Fame and Breast Defense.

Thirteen years ago, I began using glitter art as a medium in my artwork. The playful nature of these tiny reflective and colorful particles feed my inspiration, while still maintaining the substance of my motif. From cultural icons to nostalgic cereal boxes, my work is enhanced by prominent clean lines, adept shading technique, and the utilization of vibrant color. With appreciative patrons and collectors ranging from rock stars to 1st graders, my work is the ultimate conversation piece on any wall.

Recognized as one of the pioneers of this avant-garde artistry, I continue to mature and develop as an artist. As I stay true to my chosen medium some of my recent subject matter has taken on a serious tone, addressing social issues such as equal rights and GMO’s. I have been delighted to discover that glitter adds to my commentary in a way that is demanded in contemporary art today. As well as making the most benign icon “pop” and old romances “novel”, glitter also has the capability to amplify potent content, eliciting a sense of irony, while also accentuating the contradictory temperament between the subject matter and the medium.